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4 Ways to Show Your Plants Some Beer LOVE

There seems to be some serious debate over whether or not beer is good for plants.  Some say it’s a great fertilizer, others say not so much.  However, beer bottles can be very plant friendly!  So with Earth Day approaching, I wanted to share a few ideas for showing your plants some beer love without wasting good beer or killing our oxygen loving friends.

1.  Make a Beer Bottle Plant Watering Globe.   Ever seen those overpriced glass globes that you fill with water and put into the plants for extended drip watering?  Well guess what, beer bottles can serve the same purpose – no money spent, and you’ll be repurposing.

2.  Proven Slug Killer Got Slugs???  Place a small amount of beer in a jar and bury the neck of the jar to drown slugs. Make sure to empty and replace the liquid after a rain since it will be diluted.

3.  Make an Indoor Bottle Garden Great DIY project.  Bring some fresh air and greenery indoors and reuse those bottles!  Visit Design Sponge for a step by step tutorial for creating an indoor garden out of empty beer bottles! .

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Photo by Design Sponge

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4.  Build a Bottle Walkway or Raised Flower Bed

Bury your bottles, bottoms up in the dirt for a interesting border edge to your flower bed. …Or stack them sideways for a raised bed. 

Photos from Apartment Therapy and Pinterest

Have other beer and garden ideas?  Or more creative ways to reuse those beer remnants?   Leave a comment and share!

Happy EarthDay!  Cheers Beers!

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BeerVenture to DC’s Churchkey

January 17, 2012 1 comment

“Just put me in the car and I’ll go wherever you take me.”  That’s what I tell my husband when he starts planning a day trip to to somewhere.  He plans, I participate.  So on a gorgeous 60 degree day in January, we both jumped in the car and on the DC metro, then walked a good mile uptown to DC’s Churchkey .

The Churchkey features 555 beers from 30 countries, 55 are on draught.  Small pours and pints are available so you can test out a bunch without overloading.  We sampled local brews, including an exceptional IPA called the Corruption from DC Brau; as well as some farmhouse style collaboration beers from Stillwater, DOG Brewing, The Brewers Art, and Oliver out of Baltimore; Bear Republic’s tasty Heritage wee heavy scotch ale; and an unusual fruit beer from Japan (I couldn’t pronounce it, much less spell it).  In fact, we hardly scraped the surface of the beer menu which was categorized not by style but by flavor type – sour, smoked, fruit, hop, crisp, malt…

The Churchkey’s bar is dark and kinda urban-retro, located on the 2nd floor of an old building atop the four star Birch & Barley restaurant.  The executive chef for both the bar and the restaurant is a NYC CIA graduate, so the food is as fab as the beer.  We noshed on deep fried cheese stuffed pickled cherry peppers and crisp bricks of tender fried macaroni and cheese.  Piled up plates of golden tater tots were also a bar favorite.

The neighborhoods of DC have come a long way over the past decade.  The once smelly and not so warm and fuzzy areas have been converted into lovely neighborhoods lined with refurbished row homes populated by hip urbanites who are having an exceptionally positive influence on the local beer scene.  In fact, Beer Advocate recently ranked DC as one of the top five fastest growing beer cities in the US.  You’ll see why, as locals and visitors alike flock to window front tables overlooking the neighborhood streets.

Tack this one onto your next DC visit.  The Churchkey is a relaxing place to hang out and try some different beers, enjoy world class food, and explore the lovely residential side of our nation’s capital.  It’s also a brisk walk away from the local attractions….like the museums, the conference center…or the next beer bar.

Cheer beers!

More New Life for Old Beer Bottles – Bottle Melts

All of these are made from used beer bottles that were slumped in my kiln.  I have a large ceramics kiln that’s the perfect size for melting large bottles.  We have lots of ideas for decorating these, like sand blasting and etching.  But the painted bottle labels are the most fun, since the bottles usually retain the painted design when melted.

Flattened bottles make great individual sushi plates, as well a cheese plates, and the smaller bottles work well as spoon rests.

If you’re interested in the actual process of melting bottles (as opposed to using the microwave, campfire or blow torch), check out my Bottle Melts post at Paula’s GlassRoots.

Cheers beers!

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